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      Blue and White Collar 2018 In Review

      Blue and White Collar 2018 In Review

      Hi Friends!

      After a little bit of a blog hiatus I'm back and ready to fill your brains with some fantastic and titillating information about our company and why you should buy copious amounts of our product!
      But in all reality it struck me this morning that our success should also be your success as our loyal customers. It seemed fitting that we should pull back the proverbial curtain, as it were, to let you guys know how 2018 has been for us.
       
      To be quite transparent with you all, I'm writing this while sitting in an office in New York City taking a break from some semi-meaningless freelance work trying to make a living as a graphic designer and biding my time until one day, hopefully, Blue and White Collar can become a full time job and source of income for myself and the rest of us here at B&W. It's breaks like these where I can think about growing this company and working with some of my best friends that takes a bit of the drudgery out of every day life. 
      Right now this company is a side hustle for us and one that we're working on every day to turn into something that will last for a long time and become our full-time work. And with that in mind I wanted to share a bit with you guys about what we've accomplished this year, and what we hope to accomplish in 2019. 
      Our year began much like 2017 ended, and that was pretty uneventfully. We got caught in the doldrums of coasting and not having too much activity on our site. So we decided to launch our second Kickstarter campaign where we hoped to build upon the success of our first. We wanted to at least double the total of our first Kickstarter when we made just under $22,000. We began plotting how we could get more people to pledge, get the word out more effectively, and hopefully launch ourselves into a great year. Unfortunately, due to some changes with Kickstarter and their pivot away from fashion centric campaigns, we were buried deep in the website and could essentially only be found by people who directly searched us out. When the campaign ended, we had an almost identical number of backers and made less than $19,000. Needless to say we were all disappointed in the results of the campaign.
      We were still excited about where the company was headed and continued to think that eventually things would pick up and people would start buying. In the mean time myself, David Shum, and Timmy Bates all graduated from Brigham Young University and began our lives as college grads and people looking for work. Throughout the summer we all were hit with varying levels of disillusionment about work, our industry, and our futures. And it was right during this time that orders began rolling in. 
      In June we, seemingly out of nowhere, we had our biggest month of sales ever by a wide, wiiiiiiide margin. Then in July we topped that month. Then in August we topped it again. All of the sudden we were selling shirts left and right. We couldn't keep the shirts in stock quick enough and it was a surprise to all of us. However, after discussing this trend during a team meeting one week we realized that all of the work we had been putting in over the past year was beginning to pay off. You guys had put your faith in us at the beginning and bought a shirt or two (maybe even 10), wore them, liked them, and then ordered again! We knew we had a great product from day one but were always scared no one would care. Or worse, we were delusional. But after our smashing summer success we all began to realize (I think for the first time, although some would disagree) this could be something that really makes an impact going forward. 
      Once we got our new shipment of shirts in right before Black Friday we were hopeful that we hadn't lost out on too many new customers or new sales. Again, we were blown away by your collective response. All of the sudden our record setting numbers during the summer looked like chump change compared to our month of November. It got to a point where every day we were exchanging excited texts back and forth telling each other what new mark we had hit or all of the new people who were interested in our shirts. Thanks to all of you out there we have been able to keep that momentum going into December and hopefully into the new year. Now that the year is coming to a close, and with the wedding of one of our founders Ben Perkins no less, we can't wait to see what 2019 has in store for all of us.
      I want to take this time to say the most sincere and heartfelt 'Thank You' to everyone who has bought a shirt, visited our site, liked an instagram post, or any other form of support. We started this company as a group of friends who wanted to build something, and with all of your help we have begun to see real results. Our excitement is off the charts and we can't wait to continue to grow with you. 
      Thanks for coming along for the ride over the past year and a half and we hope that you'll stick around for a long while still.
      Happy Holidays and Happy New Year. Let's make 2019 the best one yet!
      -Jordan and the Blue and White Collar team

      How to Become a Timeless Style Icon

      How to Become a Timeless Style Icon

      Recently I’ve been thinking about how style is ever evolving and ever changing. You never know quite what you’ll see come down the catwalk at New York or Paris Fashion Week. And honestly, it’s usually a bit of a catastrophe. I do indeed realize that these expressions seen at Fashion Week are less of practical fashion design, and more of the artistic prowess that designers have. But, where is the line between aspirational fashion, and extremism for extremism’s sake?
       
      Now that you’ve indulged me by experiencing some of the looks from February’s Milan Fashion week, you understand how impractical this is. And these are THE BEST looks!
       
      Style can be avant garde and there’s nothing wrong with that. Being bold and daring to try something new should be encouraged when it comes to style. David Bowie, and Prince come to mind as men who were fashion icons who were always evolving, and always ahead of what other’s were thinking in terms of clothing. But practicality was never their strong suit…
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
      When I look back at photographs of icons from the past, the ones that stand out are not the ones with outlandish outfits, but the men who if you were to see them on the street today, they’d still look like the coolest person on the block. We're not talking about bellbottom pants, massive shirt collars from the 70s, or acid washed jeans. We are talking about the simple, tried and true style statements that have lasted for generations and will last for many more to come. Some styles fade, but others live forever.
       
       
      It comes down to having what I like to call “the basics”. Things that every man needs. Every man needs a pair of great jeans, a couple solid color casual button up shirts (short and long sleeves), a plain white and a plain black t-shirt, a thick flannel shirt (a personal favorite), versatile leather shoes or boots that can be dressed up or down, a well tailored suit, and arguably the most important thing; a white dress shirt. No other piece of clothing has been in style longer, and no item will ever outlast it. Nothing will ever look as good, or make the man wearing it feel as good as a great fitting dress shirt. Wow, how fortuitous that we ended up talking about dress shirts on the blog of a website that sells white dress shirts?? Who would have thought?
       
      Let’s all try to be a little more like these afore-pictured men and remember how iconic the basics are.
       
      Lots of love,
      Jordan & the Blue and White Collar team

      The Fine Line Between Paying Too Much and Too Little

      The Fine Line Between Paying Too Much and Too Little

      People always say that you have to pay for quality. Or you get what you pay for. When you hear these phrases it's usually in regards to needing to pay a lot of money in order to experience high-quality craftsmanship. While I agree that this is indeed the case to an extent, but where is the line that tips the scale where we pay too much for something that's just not worth it?  

      The fashion industry has been dominated by the big name label for as long as major fashion houses have existed. Names of designers have been sewed into clothing since the mid-1800s, and since then we've been paying a premium for those names because of the quality and status they boast. Take a moment and look at what you're wearing today. How many labels are you outwardly representing? From the swoosh on your Nike sneakers to the small red tag on the back of your Levi's jeans, we have all become a part of paying for the brands we know and trust. 

      Most of the time these brands carry a weight of expertise or unmatched tradition. Nike arguably makes the best athletic shoes. But what happens when a high fashion brand like Balenciaga attempts to recreate the sneaker but sell it for nearly $1,000? Have we passed the line of paying too much for a pair of sneakers? What about H&M who sells a pair of sneakers for $12? Are we now paying far too little for quality? I think most people would agree that settling on a pair of Nikes is probably the best option in that scenario for finding a pair of shoes that will last the longest, have the most comfort, and the newest tech, as well as paying a fair price for the aforementioned features. 

      But what happens when a new clothing market begins to pop up? Who sets the standard for what a piece of clothing is worth? Enter the performance dress shirt. Before we opened our doors we began to see a few performance dress shirt brands begin selling shirts and realized that the cost was ridiculous. As college students and young professionals, we simply couldn't afford to pay $150 for a single performance dress shirt. We also didn't want to have to wear the hot, wrinkled, and uncomfortable shirts we'd experienced our entire lives and be forced to pay an equally high price or pay a few dollars for a poorly made product. This is where we at Blue and White Collar come in.

      We wanted to make an affordable performance dress shirt. A shirt with all the features we dreamt of. Breathable, stretchy, wrinkle-free and stain resistant. We wanted to make this shirt of the highest quality, but we wanted to make sure people like us could afford to buy them. We want you to be able to look like a million dollars without having to pull in a seven-figure paycheck. We also wanted to go above and beyond what these shirts that cost over $100 were doing by making our shirts out of recycled plastic. We wanted to help solve the problem of polluted oceans and ecosystems when you bought a shirt from us. So now when you're buying a Blue and White Collar shirt, you're buying the most sustainably made performance dress shirt as well.

      We're constantly striving to make sure we can get you the best shirts at the best prices so you can rest assured that we've got you covered with the highest quality shirts and the lowest price.

       

      Jordan and the Blue and White Collar team